WP_Query Object ( [query] => Array ( [post_type] => post [cat] => 41,42 [posts_per_page] => 12 [meta_key] => news_in_evidenza [meta_value] => 1 ) [query_vars] => Array ( [post_type] => post [cat] => 41 [posts_per_page] => 12 [meta_key] => news_in_evidenza [meta_value] => 1 [error] => [m] => [p] => 0 [post_parent] => [subpost] => [subpost_id] => [attachment] => [attachment_id] => 0 [name] => [static] => [pagename] => [page_id] => 0 [second] => [minute] => [hour] => [day] => 0 [monthnum] => 0 [year] => 0 [w] => 0 [category_name] => archive-news [tag] => [tag_id] => [author] => [author_name] => [feed] => [tb] => [paged] => 0 [preview] => [s] => [sentence] => [title] => [fields] => [menu_order] => [embed] => [category__in] => Array ( ) [category__not_in] => Array ( ) [category__and] => Array ( ) [post__in] => Array ( ) [post__not_in] => Array ( ) [post_name__in] => Array ( ) [tag__in] => Array ( ) [tag__not_in] => Array ( ) [tag__and] => Array ( ) [tag_slug__in] => Array ( ) [tag_slug__and] => Array ( ) [post_parent__in] => Array ( ) [post_parent__not_in] => Array ( ) [author__in] => Array ( ) [author__not_in] => Array ( ) [ignore_sticky_posts] => [suppress_filters] => [cache_results] => 1 [update_post_term_cache] => 1 [lazy_load_term_meta] => 1 [update_post_meta_cache] => 1 [nopaging] => [comments_per_page] => 50 [no_found_rows] => [order] => DESC ) [tax_query] => WP_Tax_Query Object ( [queries] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [taxonomy] => category [terms] => Array ( [0] => 41 [1] => 42 ) [field] => term_id [operator] => IN [include_children] => 1 ) ) [relation] => AND [table_aliases:protected] => Array ( [0] => wp_term_relationships ) [queried_terms] => Array ( [category] => Array ( [terms] => Array ( [0] => 41 [1] => 42 ) [field] => term_id ) ) [primary_table] => wp_posts [primary_id_column] => ID ) [meta_query] => WP_Meta_Query Object ( [queries] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [key] => news_in_evidenza [value] => 1 ) [relation] => OR ) [relation] => AND [meta_table] => wp_postmeta [meta_id_column] => post_id [primary_table] => wp_posts [primary_id_column] => ID [table_aliases:protected] => Array ( [0] => wp_postmeta ) [clauses:protected] => Array ( [wp_postmeta] => Array ( [key] => news_in_evidenza [value] => 1 [compare] => = [alias] => wp_postmeta [cast] => CHAR ) ) [has_or_relation:protected] => ) [date_query] => [request] => SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS wp_posts.ID FROM wp_posts LEFT JOIN wp_term_relationships ON (wp_posts.ID = wp_term_relationships.object_id) INNER JOIN wp_postmeta ON ( wp_posts.ID = wp_postmeta.post_id ) JOIN wp_icl_translations t ON wp_posts.ID = t.element_id AND t.element_type = CONCAT('post_', wp_posts.post_type) WHERE 1=1 AND ( wp_term_relationships.term_taxonomy_id IN (41,42) ) AND ( ( wp_postmeta.meta_key = 'news_in_evidenza' AND wp_postmeta.meta_value = '1' ) ) AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post' AND (wp_posts.post_status = 'publish' OR wp_posts.post_status = 'acf-disabled') AND ( ( t.language_code = 'en' AND wp_posts.post_type IN ('post','page','attachment','custom_css','customize_changeset','acf-field-group','wpcf7_contact_form','products' ) ) OR wp_posts.post_type NOT IN ('post','page','attachment','custom_css','customize_changeset','acf-field-group','wpcf7_contact_form','products' ) ) GROUP BY wp_posts.ID ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC LIMIT 0, 12 [posts] => Array ( [0] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11759 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2021-10-26 16:30:05 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-10-26 14:30:05 [post_content] => 26th October 2021 There are many reasons why RAIN (UHF) RFID technology is having success , one of the more important is the ability to read tags at distance of some meters. But why it is possible with RAIN RFID and not with other passive RFID technologies like LF or HF/NFC ? All the former passive RFID technologies like, as said, LF and HF/NFC use magnetic field to transfer energy and information. To obtain this result both the reader antenna and the tag antenna are formed by coils that needs to stay in proximity in order to obtain the so called “inductive coupling” that permits the energy transfer between the antenna of the reader and the one of the tag. This is the reason why the reading distance of LF and HF/NFC technology is typically limited to few centimeters and, only using very high-power levels and very big antennas, it can reach a distance of a meter. RAIN technology  uses instead the electromagnetic field to transfer energy and information, the same used by cell phones, radio and tv communication. In this case the antenna of the reader and the one of the tag don’t need to “couple” so they don’t need to stay in proximity and the energy and information exchange can happen at longer distances. The reading distance is anyway limited because the tags are passive and need to harvest the energy from the reader signal, energy that decrease with the square of the distance, but it can reach a value of some meters, up to 20 mt. in some situation, a distance that opened a new range of applications. We typically talk about reading distance, but it is more the volume covered by the electromagnetic field that is important in many scenarios, especially for inventory applications, because it permits bulk readings, i.e. reading of hundreds of tags in few seconds. This is also related to another advantage of the RAIN technology: using higher frequency it permits to exchange information at  higher speed. All these improvements are possible from the beginning of this century because of the availability of very low power demanding chips (the energy transferred with the electromagnetic field is much lower than the energy transferred using magnetic field) and the continuous evolution in the technology on both readers and tags is improving the performances every year. [post_title] => The farther the better [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => the-farther-the-better [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-26 16:48:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-26 14:48:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.caenrfid.com/?p=11759/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11654 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2021-09-27 10:58:40 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-09-27 08:58:40 [post_content] => 27th September 2021 The passive adjective really applies only to the tags or labels and, in few words, just means that they don’t need any local power (e.g., a battery) to operate. Not having a battery on the labels have many advantages related to cost, maintenance and reliability making the passive characteristic a key point for the success of the technology. Anyway, RAIN RFID tags, even if highly integrated, are electronic circuits so they require to be powered in some way to work. Missing a battery, tags need to get the power from somewhere else using a technique called energy harvesting that capture energy from the environment, maybe the most famous example of energy harvesting is solar power where the solar radiation is converted in electricity. RAIN RFID technology uses instead the radio signal coming from the reader: the tag’s antenna gathers the signal and a circuit inside the tag’s chip converts that signal in electric current used to power all the rest of the circuitry. So, the first part of the communication between the reader and the tags is a “blank” signal, called carrier, that is used just to provide power, a signal that need to be maintained along all the time the communication is in place. The exchange of information is then realized using the same signal, just changing its shape with a technique called modulation so that the energy is maintained but the tag can recognize the changes in the signal shape and interpret them as data. It is something like the USB where a single cable is used both to provide power and to communication with the devices. So, now that the tag is powered and the reader is sending information that the tag can interpret, how it can reply to reader? RAIN RFID tags do not have any real transmit circuitry, there is not enough power for that. Again, the solution is on a passive technique called backscattering. Backscattering is basically a signal reflection: the antenna of the tag is a metal object and hence it reflects radio signals, furthermore it is designed to work with radio signals, so it is particularly efficient both on receiving and on reflecting signals. The way how the tag sends information back to the reader is again modulating the reflected signal, the antenna is connected to the chip circuitry that can decide if the antenna must reflect more or less signal (amplitude modulation). To explain this technique in an intuitive way, imagine two persons, Ann (the reader) and John (the tag), that want to communicate at distance. For doing that Ann has a flashlight and John has a small mirror. First, they need to agree on a language, let say they decide to use the Morse code to encode and decode information. Now they can start to exchange information: Ann emits short and long flashes according to the Morse encoding so that John can decode the light pulses and get the information. After that, Ann holds the flashlight powered to emit a continuous light beam so that John can use his mirror to reflect the light: holding the mirror in front of the light John reflects the light coming from Ann while turning it on a side the light is not reflected so he can send back information to Ann using the same Morse code. Obviously, this is just an intuitive explanation of a technology that is much more complex, but I hope it can give you a rough idea of how the technology works even to people, like me, that is not an electronic engineer. [post_title] => To be passive could be positive [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => to-be-passive-could-be-positive [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-09-27 11:28:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-09-27 09:28:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.caenrfid.com/?p=11654/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11519 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2021-08-02 11:05:54 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-08-02 09:05:54 [post_content] => 2nd August 2021 Automatic Identification technologies start always from a basic point: assign an identity to the object.
RAIN RFID is not an exception and, like many other AutoID technologies, permits to  choose the right code for the object, in other words, the memory where the code is stored inside a label is rewritable.

So, how to choose the right code for your item?

There are two main options: using a proprietary or a standard coding scheme. A proprietary code is typically simpler to implement, you choose the rules to build your code and you generate the codes accordingly. Having full freedom you can adapt the code to your needs, you can make the code human readable or to be simply numeric. It’s your code and when you use it inside your company it works well but …
What happens when one of your labels leaves your company? You are the only one knowing the rules used to build the code and, consequently, the only one able to decode it. If you are a manufacturer probably your resellers are not happy about that, they will need to replace your labels if they use RAIN RFID to organize their processes. Same situation if a foreign label enters your company. But this is not the worse thing! With barcode labels you read only one label at a time so it’s simple to understand which item is coded incorrectly, it is the one you are reading in that moment. With RAIN RFID technology you read multiple labels at a time, typically hundreds of labels in a few seconds and without a line of sight so it is not simple to recognize which labels are coded incorrectly. Even worse, some of the foreign labels can have a code that can be decoded using your rules even if it was encoded with different rules!

As a silly example look at the picture below.

The code “EVENTONE#1234” can be created starting from different data sources. The result is that you can enter an event using a cosmetic product or you can think to have a cosmetic product on the shelf while, maybe, a customer has a ticket in his pocket. The solution for all these potential problems (and others) is simple: using a code scheme compliant with a global standard. A global standard, like  GS1 or ISO codes, ensures that your code is unique not only inside your company but across all organizations in the world. They also have other useful features, like standard headers that define the type of code and that you can use to filter unwanted labels avoiding errors in your database. Using  standard codes is mandatory if your product flows along an open supply chain where different stakeholders need to read and decode correctly your code but, as discussed above, it is always a good idea, even if your tag never exits from your company. But, if you still have some special reasons to use proprietary codes, there is a fair way to do so, ISO standard provides a method to define proprietary codes with a special header that says “Hey, this is a proprietary code!” informing the user who can decide to ignore it or to decode it. [post_title] => The Importance of a standard code [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => the-importance-of-standard-code [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-08-04 10:47:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-08-04 08:47:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.caenrfid.com/?p=11519/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11431 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2021-07-14 13:15:10 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-07-14 11:15:10 [post_content] => 14th July 2021 Eximia, a Filippetti Group company, designs end-to-end RFID solutions for integrated logistics for over 20 years.
The company has developed Octopus, an intelligent RAIN RFID middleware that allows companies to govern the field components of an RFID project and to connect the physical and digital worlds.
Thank to the collaboration between CAEN RFID and Eximia, the Octopus Middleware is now fully compliant and integrated with CAEN RFID readers, enhancing the data & process integration ability that is necessary to face the evolution of the logistics world and digitize processes along the supply chain. The Eximia middleware allows to collect field data in real time, manage devices and readings from RFID readers (including single or massive reader configuration) and to send data to ERP and MES systems to convert them into strategic information thanks to the Business Intelligence (BI) capabilities. The Octopus middleware is a key component of the integrated holistic Enterprise Logistics Platform (hELP) developed by Eximia.   [post_title] => Eximia Octopus [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => eximia-octopus [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-08-04 10:11:33 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-08-04 08:11:33 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.caenrfid.com/?p=11431/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11365 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2021-07-08 17:16:58 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-07-08 15:16:58 [post_content] => 7th July 2021 CAEN RFID unveils the Lepton3 and the Lepton7, two new RAIN RFID reader modules powered by the next-generation Impinj E310 and E710 RAIN RFID reader chips.

As early adopters of the new Impinj reader chips and an Impinj Gold Partners, we are proud to be among the first companies announcing products based on the newly released chips.

The Lepton3 is the entry level module with an output power of 25 dBm and a sensitivity of -72 dBm, good performances for many short to medium range application at an affordable price point. The Leptonis a high-performance module, with an output power of 30 dBm and a sensitivity of -85 dBm is well suited for long range applications like high performance handheld and fixed readers. Both modules are multiregional so a single SKU can be configured to work in almost any country and they are software and pin compatible so you can easily upgrade or downgrade device performances without changing your board design or your application development.   [post_title] => Lepton3 and Lepton7 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => lepton3-and-lepton7 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-07-09 11:48:58 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-07-09 09:48:58 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.caenrfid.com/?p=11365/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11274 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2021-06-24 10:24:17 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-06-24 08:24:17 [post_content] => 24th June2021 Cisper and CAEN RFID are glad to announce a renewed collaboration to improve the adoption of the RAIN RFID technology in Europe. “CAEN RFID and Cisper are working together for many years already but have now decided to cooperate even closer. We believe that the CAEN RFID product portfolio offers valuable product solutions that can be beneficial for your customers. Also, the OEM modules from the CAEN RFID offering are a good starting point for your embedded RFID solutions” says Leon De Ridder, Cisper’s Managing Director. “CAEN RFID is proud to be part of the Cisper offering since they always select  "best in class" readers and tags for the European market. We strongly believe that a closer collaboration between the two companies will bring value to the RAIN RFID technology implementers.” confirm Stefano Coluccini, CAEN RFID’s Chief Marketing Officer. [post_title] => Cisper and CAEN RFID reinforce the partnership for the European market [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => cisper-and-caen-rfid [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-06-25 12:40:46 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-06-25 10:40:46 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.caenrfid.com/?p=11274/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11016 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2021-06-04 12:36:24 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-06-04 10:36:24 [post_content] => 4th June2021 Designing a high performance RAIN RFID reader is not an easy job. Even if today you can choose a chipset platform on the market that implements most of the needed features and build the reader around it, you still have to face with many technical details, especially regarding the correct handling of Ultra High Frequency signals. So, even if you don’t need to know every detail of the RAIN RFID air protocol[1], you still need very good radio frequency skills to obtain good reading performances and to comply with regulations. Reading tags at long distances requires two main things: generate a high power signal to “activate” the tags and a good receiver sensitivity in order to be able to “intercept” the very small signals reflected by the tags[2] but none of the two come for free. To generate high power levels you need to add a power amplifier (and other circuitry) between the chipset output and the antenna connector and assure that the resulting signal is clean enough in order to avoid interferences, to comply with regulations and to avoid the self jamming effect[3]. All these aspects require high radiofrequency skills for the design and a specific care on the manufacturing of the PCB (Printed Circuit Board). But, if you are looking to build a RAIN RFID reader or to embed the technology in your device, there is a simpler way: CAEN RFID provides a wide range of embedded components to integrate RAIN RFID functionality. You can always find the component that fits perfect on your device, because CAEN RFID offers various modules diversified for form factor, read distance and power consumption. Combining the embedded module with a computing platform, you can design a smart and high performance RAIN RFID reader with limited design efforts. Depending on the project, the computing platform can be custom designed or chosen from the many available on the market, such as an Arduino, a Raspberry or a BeagleBone just to cite some of the well-known ones. CAEN RFID provides a complete SDK for the most common programming languages (Java, .NET and C) so that you don’t need to write the code for the protocol interpretation but just the code for the solution. Furthermore CAEN RFID offer in depth technical support on both hardware and software topics as well as support for the certification process of your product using its modules. You can discover all CAEN RIFID embedded modules offer on the website or contact us to get advise on the right module for your application. [1] the protocol used by readers and tags to communicate each other. [2] passive RAIN RFID tags have no power source to generate signals so they use a technology called backscatter that use signal reflections to communicate with the reader. [3] self-generated noise that create problems with the receiver part of the reader. [post_title] => The simpler way to build your own RFID reader [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => the-simpler-way-to-build-your-own-rfid-reader [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-06-04 12:45:51 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-06-04 10:45:51 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.caenrfid.com/?p=11016/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10937 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2021-05-20 09:08:55 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-05-20 07:08:55 [post_content] => 20th May 2021 R4i developed a fully integrated platform to track and trace any tagged object through time and space. Thanks to the long-term collaboration between CAEN RFID and R4i we are today proud to announce that all the CAEN RFID readers are fully supported by the Nebula platform, allowing fast and straightforward implementation of RFID based track and trace solutions. The Nebula platform take care of all the RFID technology details so you can concentrate your efforts on the business relevant aspects of the solution. Offering a REST API interface, Nebula makes it simple to integrate the RFID solution to existing business application. The platform also supports CAEN RFID sensor loggers to add information about the environment surrounding the object enriching the standard set of information (identity and location). Using temperature loggers, for example, the solution can monitor shipments of perishable products like vaccines or fresh food.   [post_title] => Nebula integrates CAEN RFID, together to innovate RFID T&T solutions. [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => nebula-integrates-caen-rfid-together-to-innovate-rfid-tt-solutions [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-05-20 09:43:06 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-05-20 07:43:06 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.caenrfid.com/?p=10937/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10892 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2021-05-14 15:47:57 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-05-14 13:47:57 [post_content] => Just as the famous Swiss Army knife, the Hex reader has many tools grouped in a single object so that it is useful in many circumstances. Look at the list of “tools”:
  • Display and keypad, a local human interface that allow to change the behavior of the reader without the need for a connected PC.
  • Mounting holes that permit to fix the reader on top or below a counter or even to fix it on a wall.
  • USB host interface to connect USB peripheral like a barcode reader to easily implement a RAIN RFID encoding station.
  • Connector of an external antenna in case you need a wider reading area.
  • Digital I/Os to connect additional triggers and signals.
  • Web configuration interface to easily use the reader without any software development.
  • Scripting engine to fully customize the reader behavior by a Java application.
  Using the local keypad and display, a sales assistant can decide if a scan is related to a sale or if it is a return. In a small warehouse the Hex reader can be used as a mid-range fixed reading point for incoming good scannings. line Connected to a barcode reader, the Hex can be easily transformed in a simple encoding station that reads barcodes and program the RAIN RFID chips accordingly.     [post_title] => CAEN RFID Hex, the RAIN RFID Swiss Army Knife [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => caen-rfid-hex-the-rain-rfid-swiss-army-knife [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-05-26 17:54:17 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-05-26 15:54:17 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.caenrfid.com/?p=10892/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10853 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2021-05-07 09:13:10 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-05-07 07:13:10 [post_content] => boards 7th May 2021 An unexpected effect of the pandemic is an unprecedented global shortage in semiconductor microchips. During last year consumers stocked up several electronic devices like laptops and smartphones to set up workstations at home or smart tv and game consoles to have more entertainment opportunities in lockdown periods. The automotive sector, after a drop in vehicle sales in spring 2020, registered a rush increase on vehicle demand in the third quarter, running out of their electronic components inventory. Today carmakers too were forced to scale back their output. Microchips are now used everywhere and manufacturers are unable to produce them fast enough and the supply chain was not able to keep up with the growing demand. The shortage squeezed warehouses and drove up costs of electronic components increasing the price of final products. CAEN RFID is facing this global scenario just like any other company using chips in their production. To avoid the risk of remaining out of stock or to delay deliveries, our company increased electronic components stocks, deciding to purchase them in advance to supply future production needs. Clients can help us to deal with the global chip shortage placing blanket purchase orders or sharing with us their production forecasts. In this way CAEN RFID will organize the production accordingly to the real demand, planning in advance the future request. We think this could be the solution to match your needs and synchronize the production, to simplify buying process for both parties and to overpass this crisis together. Despite the component cost increasing, CAEN RFID is committed to keeping the price list locked for the whole of 2021 to meet customers satisfaction. [post_title] => Help us to deal with the global chip shortage! [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => help-us-to-deal-with-the-global-chip-shortage [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-05-07 09:18:35 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-05-07 07:18:35 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.caenrfid.com/?p=10853/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [10] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10794 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2021-04-21 18:52:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-04-21 16:52:09 [post_content] => 21st April 2021 The relevance of a good cold chain management was never so at the center of the global attention as it is today. We are now all aware that Pfizer/Biontech vaccine need to be transported and stored at -70°C, or that Moderna vaccine, after being unfrozen, need to be preserved in the 2°C to 8°C temperature range for a maximum of 30 days before to be inoculated. What is not probably so well known is that the good conservation is not a peculiarity of SARS-Cov2 vaccines, on the contrary, it is a common issue for any pharmaceutical product, from the newest biological treatments to a simple analgesic you can even buy at the grocery store (yes, analgesic have to be preserved between 15°C and 25°C). But a good cold chain management is something needed also in other areas, a lot of products are sensitive to temperature excursions or to other environmental parameters like humidity or vibrations. Something familiar to all of us is food, you know very well what happens if you do not store your seafood in the fridge and, going backwards in the supply chain, you cannot imagine how much fresh food is wasted because it is not preserved at the right temperature in the warehouses. Anyway, food and drugs are not the only products that need to be maintained in the right conditions: tobacco, for example, suffers humidity, fragile goods are sensible to vibrations and shocks, and there are special chemicals (like some industrial adhesives) that need to be preserved at -50°C until few minutes before their usage. Obviously the most important aspect in cold chain is the ability to maintain the right environment for the products during transportation and storage but it is also very important to know if this has been done. An industrial adhesive will not work as expected and you could lose a part of your car while you are driving, you can suffer a disease because you ate badly preserved fish or the vaccine you are getting could result to be ineffective if not dangerous for your health. This is why cold chain monitoring is so important: you can know in advance if the product was preserved correctly avoiding bad consequences of its usage! As you may understand this is not an easy task to perform considering the volume of goods that travel every day around the world but today, we can count on the support of IoT technologies and, in particular, on RFID technologies. Adding a RAIN RFID tag to perishable products permits to track them in an efficient and automated way but you need something more to monitor the environment around your product: a sensor and a memory where to store the sensor data gathered along the life of the product. And here is where RAIN RFID semi-passive loggers are good at. In the same way and with the same infrastructure you use to keep track of the position of your product you can also obtain information about environmental parameters. At the end of the transportation or even at checkpoints along the supply chain you can get all the information, with a minimum human intervention or even completely automatically (improving the efficiency of the data collection and reduces errors). Furthermore, combined RAIN/NFC loggers allow to extend the benefits of cold chain monitoring to the final user since he can use his own smartphone to retrieve the history of the product and be guaranteed that the quality conform to what is expected.   DISCOVER MORE ABOUT CAEN RFID LOGGERS   [post_title] => RFID Talk: RFID loggers take the cold chain under control [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => rfid-talk-rfid-loggers-take-the-cold-chain-under-control [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-04-21 19:06:02 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-04-21 17:06:02 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.caenrfid.com/?p=10794/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [11] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10744 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2021-04-14 17:25:23 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-04-14 15:25:23 [post_content] => 14th April 2021 CAEN RFID qLog is the new family of dual-frequency (RAIN RFID and NFC) loggers designed to monitor perishable products during transportation and storage. The combination of high-resolution sensors, large memory size and the standard NFC/RAIN RFID interfaces permits to implement efficient and effective track & trace solutions for the cold-chain market. The RAIN RFID interface is ideal for reading sensor data or alarms from distance allowing to build automated check points on conveyors or on dock doors. The NFC interface permits to access sensor data with any smartphone so the final user can check by himself if the product was maintained under the right environmental conditions. Currently available with temperature only (RT0012) or with combined temperature and humidity sensor (RT0013), the qLog family will be enriched soon with loggers for vibrations/shock and electric continuity (tamper function). Main characteristics:
  • Configurable sampling intervals from 5 sec. to 18 hours.
  • Up to 4096 sensor data samples storage size
  • Up to 16 configurable temperature range and associated alarms
  • Long battery life (up to 1 year)
  • A reset function permits to reuse the same logger for multiple shipments mitigating the monitoring cost per shipment
    [post_title] => qLog the dual-frequency logger for cold-chain safety [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => qlog-the-dual-frequency-logger-for-cold-chain-safety [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-04-14 18:03:10 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-04-14 16:03:10 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.caenrfid.com/?p=10744/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 12 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11759 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2021-10-26 16:30:05 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-10-26 14:30:05 [post_content] => 26th October 2021 There are many reasons why RAIN (UHF) RFID technology is having success , one of the more important is the ability to read tags at distance of some meters. But why it is possible with RAIN RFID and not with other passive RFID technologies like LF or HF/NFC ? All the former passive RFID technologies like, as said, LF and HF/NFC use magnetic field to transfer energy and information. To obtain this result both the reader antenna and the tag antenna are formed by coils that needs to stay in proximity in order to obtain the so called “inductive coupling” that permits the energy transfer between the antenna of the reader and the one of the tag. This is the reason why the reading distance of LF and HF/NFC technology is typically limited to few centimeters and, only using very high-power levels and very big antennas, it can reach a distance of a meter. RAIN technology  uses instead the electromagnetic field to transfer energy and information, the same used by cell phones, radio and tv communication. In this case the antenna of the reader and the one of the tag don’t need to “couple” so they don’t need to stay in proximity and the energy and information exchange can happen at longer distances. The reading distance is anyway limited because the tags are passive and need to harvest the energy from the reader signal, energy that decrease with the square of the distance, but it can reach a value of some meters, up to 20 mt. in some situation, a distance that opened a new range of applications. We typically talk about reading distance, but it is more the volume covered by the electromagnetic field that is important in many scenarios, especially for inventory applications, because it permits bulk readings, i.e. reading of hundreds of tags in few seconds. This is also related to another advantage of the RAIN technology: using higher frequency it permits to exchange information at  higher speed. All these improvements are possible from the beginning of this century because of the availability of very low power demanding chips (the energy transferred with the electromagnetic field is much lower than the energy transferred using magnetic field) and the continuous evolution in the technology on both readers and tags is improving the performances every year. [post_title] => The farther the better [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => the-farther-the-better [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-26 16:48:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-26 14:48:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.caenrfid.com/?p=11759/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 39 [max_num_pages] => 4 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => 1 [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 48291aa40e5c30db7a534d56e7dee0f8 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) )

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